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Ready 2 Rumble Revoltion
 

Ready 2 Rumble Revoltion

ESRB: Teen - T
Platform: Nintendo Wii
Category: Arcade, Sports
 
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Author:

Publisher: Atari
Developer: AKI

Features
Players: 1-2
Co-op: Yes

Introduction

Ready 2 Rumble Revolution brings yet another boxing game to the Wii. Having enjoyed the some of the other boxing games on other consoles I was interested in seeing what new features the creators of Ready 2 Rumble Revolution would bring to the table. Also, having played some of the previous versions in the Ready 2 Rumble franchise, and having loved the arcade action that the games provided, I looked forward to the same type of action combined with the physical workout that only the Wii can provide.

Graphics

With the capabilities the Wii has graphically, I was really impressed with the quality of graphics when it came to the individual character designs, but the backgrounds (e.g. arenas, crowds, etc) felt a little less polished. There are eighteen caricatured boxers based off of various celebrities from sports, music, television and your favourite movies. Though they do not use actual names, some of the boxers that I recognized during gameplay were Arnold Schwarzenegger, David Hasselhoff, Simon Cowell and David Beckham to name a few. The characters have a lot of personality, which can only be expected with caricatured characters, and the graphic designers added some special touches to each with their facial expressions, fighting style and special moves. You can even see the damage that has been inflicted on the boxers during a fight.

On a somewhat downside, the backgrounds seemed to be thrown together and lack the detail and attention which resulted in a look that appeared as though they were created later on in the production of the game after the characters were completed. A good example of this how the in the various crowds lack variety with the majority of the crowd just waving their arms back and forth cheering in the same ‘canned’ motion over and over again. It would have been nice for the graphics of the whole game to be on par with the graphical quality of the characters and their actions throughout the game.

Sound

The game is filled with rich sound effects and voice work that really added to the gameplay of Ready 2 Rumble Revolution. As one might expect, every move is detailed audibly from the sounds of exertion as the boxers throw their punches to the sounds of impact when a punch hits its mark. In addition to the action sounds there is an added richness to the game with some excellent background sound effects. I noted such things as how when your boxer makes their way to the ring you are surrounded with the clicks and flashes of cameras or how the crowds cheering stands out as you anxiously await the clang of the bell to start the match. Once you finally get to the fighting aspect of the game the crowds get involved with some cheering, gasps, and general fanfare that matched the actions in the ring.

The voice acting is really well done too as it is clear, distinct and easy to hear. The voices also mesh well with the personalities of the boxers, giving each of the characters a boost in depth. It was especially nice that the boxing matches were announced by Michael Buffer, whom fans of boxing will definitely recognize for his “Let’s Get Ready to Rumble” call.

The background music featured is typical for a boxing game with some arcade-like music which is mainly instrumental. Not much work was done with the soundtrack making the overall music experience very bland. Boxing games should at least have some music that is going to get you pumped up for the fight.

Gameplay

There are several game modes available in Ready 2 Rumble Revolution including Arcade, Championship, Team Fight, Quick Fight and Tournament. The best place to start as with all games is the tutorial mode which will teach you basic punches and defensive manoeuvres (block, duck, sway and weaving punches) you will use throughout the game.

The tutorial was quite easy to understand. To move you use the analog stick on the nunchuk and a double tap in a specific direction will result in a quick step. All left hand moves are performed with the nunchuk and right hand moves with the Wii Remote. Each type of punch will involve a different variation of movement of the nunchuk or Wii Remote. For example to perform a left jab you point your nunchuk forward and to perform a heavy jab you move the nunchuk left and then forward. To perform a right jab you move your Wii Remote forward and a heavy right jab involves moving the Wiimote right and then forward. When you want to do a body punch you will hold down the C button while performing a move. In the tutorial, you are also taught how to taunt. Taunting is accomplished by hitting the A button and will result in your boxer antagonizing their opponent with unique actions. Taunting will increase your rumble gauge which is used by hitting the A button and once full you can perform special power moves.

The controls were easy to learn and understand in the tutorial mode, but when you get into the fast paced action of the game I noticed the controls did not respond nearly as fast as I wanted them to. This would often cause the game to not perform the actions I was trying to complete. With a game like this the controls are what makes the game and the lack of control led to frustration and a few expressive words during some bouts when I could not get my boxer to do what I wanted him to do.

Once you get through the tutorial you can attempt to play one of the available gameplay modes. In Arcade mode you select your boxer and fight against an AI boxer. Through the options you can set such things as the number of rounds, round time, knockdown, handicap and difficulty (very easy to very hard). Quick Fight and Team Fight are multiplayer options available so that you can play locally with friends or the CPU.

The main mode available in Ready 2 Rumble Revolution is Championship mode. This is your career mode where you fight your way to the top and earn money as you win matches. When beginning this mode you will create your boxer using the character creator. You can customize the boxers profile by selecting height, weight, first & last name, hometown (City, Country), nickname (e.g. Pretty Boy, Mad Dog, Quick Fire), one of the eight voice types, call type (how the announcer introduces your boxer) and fighting style (e.g. hard puncher, rush, stamina). Once your character has been created you are then able to customize their visual appearance through the options of Base, Head, Upper Body, Lower Body, Arms and Move set. I found that it was a little disappointing that most options under the categories of tattoos and clothing are locked when you first create your boxer. It would have been nice to have a bit more variety initially. You can however, unlock/purchase additional items with the money you earn in Championship mode.

Your boxer begins their career with limited stats but you can increase your stats by training during a virtual week through a series of mini games. You can play the mini-games on their own as well in a separate option, but you will only be able to increase your stats in championship mode. The mini games are as described below:

Roadwork: While your boxer jogs follow the prompts on the screen that show where cheers are coming from. Swing the Wii Remote and Nunchuk in the correct direction to earn points before your time runs out.

Heavy Bag: Throw punches at the heavy bag until your meter is filled where you will receive a prompt to perform a specific punch. Hit the final punch correctly to earn bonus points.

Speed Bag: Hit the speed bag following the prompted directions (left only, right only and alternating). Earn points for each successful hit.

Jump Rope: Move the Wii Remote and Nunchuk in the correct direction based on the visual cues once they enter the prompt circles to keep your boxer jumping.

Medicine Ball: Perform a sit up by moving the Wii Remote and Nunchuk forward. At the top of a sit up the medicine ball may be thrown at the boxers head or stomach. Move both the Wiimote and the Nunchuk back to catch a ball thrown at the face or move both forward for one thrown at the stomach.

Hit the Mitt: Throw left, right or body punches as depicted from the visual cues.

Training Dummy: Punch and defend against the training dummy using your defensive moves blocking, duck, sway or weaving punch.

Dodge Ball: Use the correct defensive moves to block or dodge a ball being thrown at you.

After you have trained your boxer during the week you will be able to select one of the five weekend options made available to you which include Match, Special Training, Shop, Dressing Room, and Go to the next Week.

Match play is where you get your promoter to schedule a match against a proper opponent for you based on your stats that you worked on during training. Special training becomes available if you did particularly well during your weekday training and you are allowed to do some extra training to increase your stats even more. The shop and your dressing room go hand in hand. The shop is where you spend your prize money to buy new items for your boxer and to gain access to items you unlocked as you progress through your career. Your dressing room on the other hand is where you customize your boxer with the items purchased in the shop.

Match play is where you get your promoter to schedule a match against a proper opponent for you based on your stats that you worked on during training. Special training becomes available if you did particularly well during your weekday training and you are allowed to do some extra training to increase your stats even more. The shop and your dressing room go hand in hand. The shop is where you spend your prize money to buy new items for your boxer and to gain access to items you unlocked as you progress through your career. Your dressing room on the other hand is where you customize your boxer with the items purchased in the shop.

The other single player mode is Arcade, where you pick a boxer and attempt to defeat eight opponents in a row. If the single player modes are not the best way you want to spend your boxing fun you also have three multi-player modes available to you.

Quick Fight is the most basic of multi-player modes where you can jump right into a match by selecting your boxers, venue and you can also switch up the game options and rules to make the match play out the way you like it. Team Fight is another multiplayer option which is similar to Quick Fight where you can mix up your venue, game options and rules, but this time you can select a three boxer team to face off against each other in a winner stays on style match. Finally, there is Tournament mode where you participate in an eight player tournament bracket format, where the winner moves on and the loser is out until next time. Mind you, you can only play with two controls in this tournament, but there is no rules saying you can’t pass off the Wii Remote to a friend so they can get in the action as well. Having more than two Wii Remotes be able to select boxers in Tournament Mode would have been a nice addition.

One thing about the gameplay that is positive is the variety of options for solo play, as well as multiplayer. The variety of options will give gamers with different tastes some choices that they wouldn’t normally see in typical boxing games. The highlight of these options for this gamer was quick, but fun mini-games that were packaged separate from the Career Mode and accessible anytime you wished to play them. I am more likely to
pop in the game to use the speed bag and heavy bag more than wail on another boxer.


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